First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed

Facing situation where somebody has collapsed is frightening, particularly if it is somebody you know. However, there are some very simple steps that you can take to help you decide the best course of action, which in an emergency could mean the difference between life and death.

CHECK THE SCENE

Is it safe for you to approach the person who collapsed? Do not become a victim yourself. Check for dangers such as chemicals, electricity, or traffic.

If you can safely remove the danger, do so. If not, consider if you can safely and easily move the person from danger, or whether you need to call for additional help such as the fire service.

CHECK THE RESPONSE

Is the person who has collapsed conscious?

• Gently squeeze the shoulders and ask loudly, “Are you all right?”

• Speak loudly and clearly.

• Always assume there may be a neck injury and squeeze gently.

Below The most important rule of first aid is never to put yourself in danger. Do not rush to the scene; look around you to assess potential dangers. If in doubt, stay back.

For babies and young children

Do not squeeze the shoulders--- try to provoke a response by stroking the cheek or the sole of the foot and speaking loudly.

IF THERE IS NO RESPONSE

If there is no response, the immediate danger is that the victim might be unconscious and may have a blocked airway or be in need of resuscitation.
 

• Shout for help.

• If possible, leave the victim in the position in which you found him and open the airway.

• When it is not possible to carry out an assessment of the victim in the position found, turn him onto his back and open the airway.

OPEN THE AIRWAY

• Place one hand on the forehead and gently tilt the head back.

• Remove any obvious obstructions from the victim’s mouth, including dislodged dentures, but leave well-fitting dentures in place.

• Place the fingertips of two fingers under the point of the victim’s chin and lift the chin. If injury to the neck is suspected, handle the head very gently and try to avoid tilting the head too much.

For a baby, use only one finger to lift the chin and take particular care not to over tilt the head.

CHECK FOR BREATHING

Once the airway is open, the next priority is to check whether or not the person is breathing. Keep the airway open with one hand on the forehead and one hand lifting the chin. Put your cheek to the victim’s face and look down the chest.
 

• LOOK for the movement of the chest and stomach.

• LISTEN for breath sounds.

• FEEL for breathing on the side of your face.

If the victim is breathing, turn into the recovery position.

If the victim is not breathing

• Call 911 for emergency help.

If you have not already done so, make sure that an ambulance has been called.

• Start resuscitation.

ABC RESUSCITATION

Airway Ensure a clear airway. Breathing Check breathing and provide rescue breathing to the non-breathing person.

Circulation Check that the person has a good circulation and help them if their circulation has stopped or is damaged.

 
 
 
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue