First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
Dealing with Splinters and Fish Hooks

Large objects embedded in a wound, or foreign objects near to a vulnerable site such as the eye, need special care and medical treatment. Smaller debris, such as shards of glass or splinters of wood, stuck into minor wounds can usually be successfully managed at home without further treatment.

REMOVING SPLINTERS

  1. If the splinter is fully embedded in the skin, clean the wound, cover gently, and seek medical attention. If part of the splinter is out of the skin, you may try to remove it with tweezers.

  2. Pass the tweezers over the flame to clean them and reduce the risk of infection.

  3. Use the tweezers to grasp the end of the object and to gently pull it out the same angle that it went in. If the splinter breaks off in the wound or is not easy to remove, treat it as you would a larger foreign body.

  4. Once removed, squeeze the wound to express a small amount of blood, clean the site with soap and water, and gently cover with a plaster or dressing as appropriate.

  5. Splinters can carry infection to the body so check the site for any signs of infection over the coming days. Tetanus is a particular risk, especially if the splinter was obtained while gardening, so check the date of the person’s last tetanus immunization and seek a booster if necessary.


FISH HOOKS

While the injuries associated with an embedded fish hook may be relatively minor, they are particularly difficult to remove one if medical help is not readily available, for example, if you are on a boat.

WHEN MEDICAL HELP IS EASY TO ACCESS

  1. Cut the line as close to the hook as possible to prevent it catching on something and causing further damage.
  2. Pad around the hook until you can bandage over around it without pushing it further in. Seek medical help to ensure there is no underlying damage to the tissues.

WHEN MEDICAL HELP MAY TAKE SOME TIME TO ARRIVE

If you can see the barb:

  1. Cut the line as close to the hook as possible.
  2. Cut the barb away and carefully remove the hook by its eye.
  3. Clean and cover the wound and elevate if it is on a limb.
  4. Check for sign of infection over the coming days and check that the person’s tetanus booster is up-to-date.

TREATING A LARGE EMBEDDED OBJECT

  • Do not attempt to remove the object.
  • Apply pressure to the wound by padding around the base of the object over the top of sterile gauze or a piece of clean material.
  • Bandage over the padding to apply pressure without moving the object.
  • If the object is embedded in an arm or leg, elevation may help to reduce bleeding and pain.
  • Seek medical help.

If the object is very long, provide additional support at its base to prevent it from moving.

If you cannot see the barb:

1. If you are able, push the hook quickly and firmly forward through the skin until the barb can be seen.

2. Cut the barb away and then treat as outlined above.

If the barb cannot be easily removed, do not attempt to remove the hook—instead, treat as for larger embedded object
 
 
 
Abdominal Pain

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue