First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
Wilderness First Aid Kit

If planning a journey away from towns and easy access to medical treatment, consider carefully what equipment to take with you. Since you will be carrying the first aid kit yourself it should contain lightweight essential supplies. If you will be in wild country with a guide, check what equipment will be bought for the group (guides often extended training in emergency skills) and what items you should bring personally.

KEEPING WARM AND PROVIDING SHELTER

This is often the first priority for an injured person in wilderness situation. Useful equipment includes:

  • Survival bags: tough polythene body-size bags that can be used as protection from the elements. Often brightly colored, they are also a useful signaling tool
  • Sleeping bag/tent/floor mat
  • Complete spare set of clothes
  • Method of warming up hot drinks or food

SIGNALING FOR HELP
If an accident happens, the best advice is usually to stay put and call for help. Consider taking a combination of the following:

  • Cellular phone (but check network coverage in the area that you are going to be in)
  • Whistle
  • Mirror
  • Flashlight
  • Rescue flare

PROTECTION FROM THE ELEMENTS AND WILDLIFE

When shelter is limited and you are exerting yourself walking, both heatstroke and heat exhaustion are real risks. Keep your head covered and wear cool clothes that allow sweat to evaporate from the body. Drink regularly and try and keep out of the sun during its hottest time (around midday). Remember too that insect and animal bites are common.

The following may be useful additions to your kit:

  • Insect repellent
  • Over-the-counter remedy for insect stings
  • Sunscreen and sunburn remedy
  • Sunglasses

TREATING INJURIES

Restrict first aid equipment to a minimum to keep weight down.

The following should cover most key emergency situations:

  • 4 assorted sterile dressings: small, medium, and large
  • 2 triangular bandages
  • Adhesive bandages or non-adhesive dressings and hypoallergenic tape
  • Conforming bandages to fit ankles and knees (this bandage may enable a person with a sprained ankle to carry on walking to safety)
  • Gloves and face shield

INDIVIDUAL MEDICATION

It is important to know the medical requirements of all group members and to ensure that sufficient supplies of medications are carried for the trip (including extra in case conditions delay return times)
 
 
 
Wilderness First Aid Kit

 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue