First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
First Aid Kit for the Home

Most pharmacies and major supermarkets supply ready-made first aid kits for the home. Alternatively, you may wish to put together your own first aid kit to best meet the needs of your family.

STRONG FIRST AID EQUIPMENT

The equipment should be stored in a clearly labeled waterproof box in an easy-to-access position. The American symbol for first aid is a red cross on a white background.

WHAT SHOULD BE IN THE KIT?

Consider carefully the needs that you might have in the home first aid equipment. Your kit should be able to provide you with equipment to do the following tasks:

  • Manage heavy bleeding
  • Cover the minor wounds and burns
  • Clean the small cuts and scrapes
  • Provide support for strains, sprains, and broken bones
  • Provide cover for large burns
  • Apply a cold compress

In addition, you m ay want to store over-the-counter remedies with your kit, such as analgesics and extra family medications.

Numbers of each item will be influenced by the number, age, and activities of people in the home. Very young children, for example, will have lots of small bumps and scrapes and will therefore benefit from a copious supply of brightly colored bandages. Sports-minded teenagers or adults may be more at risk of sprains and strains.

POTENTIAL EQUIPMENT

Small, medium, and large dressings

These are sterile pads with bandages attached that can be used to control heavy bleeding and cover minor wounds.

Triangular bandages

These are an extremely versatile piece of equipment. Folded into a pad, they can be used as a cold compress or as padding around a painful area. They can provide cover for burns or large scrapes and support broken bones. See also Triangular Bandages.

Adhesive bandage

For small wounds.

Non-adhesive sterile dressings (various sizes), safety tape, adhesive tape, and hypoallergenic tape

Dressing can be cut to size and used to cover scrapes, burns, and small wounds.

Gauze swabs

For use with water to clean wounds.

Ace bandages, compression bandages, tubular bandage

For use in providing support to sprains and strains.

Disposable gloves

For use in managing body fluids.

Blunt-ended scissors

Tweezers

MAINTAINING YOUR KIT

Make sure that you have a system for replacing equipment when it has been used and check dressings and medication regularly to ensure that they are in date and undamaged.
 
 
 
First Aid Kit for the Home

 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue