First Aid Techniques
   
At the Emergency Scene
Action in An Emergency
Assessing a Casualty
Maintaining Airway,
Breathing, and Circulation
What to do When Somebody has Collapsed
The recovery Position for
Adults
The recovery Position for
Children and Babies
Rescue Breathing for Adults
Rescue Breathing for
Children and Babies
CPR for Adults
CPR for Children and Babies
Choking in Adults
Choking in Children
Choking in Babies
   
 
Everyday First Aid
   
Nosebleeds
Minor Wounds
Infected Wounds
Dealing with Splinters and
Fish Hooks
Foreign Bodies
Animal Bites
Insect Bites and Stings
More on Bites and Stings
Headaches
Fever
Earaches, Toothache, and
Sore Throat
Abdominal Pain
Vomiting and Diarrhea
Cramps
Hysteria, Hiccups, and Panic
Attacks
Allergies
   
 
Equipment, Medicines, and Complementary Medicine
   
Using Dressings and Cold
Compresses
Bandaging
First Aid Kit for the Home
First Aid Kit for the Car
Wilderness First Aid Kit
Observation Chart/Victim
Record
Storing and Using Medication
Commonly Prescribed
Drugs:
What They Do and Side
Effects
Drug Interactions
The Complementary
Medicine Chest
   
 
 
 
 
First Aid Kit for the Car

More than 40,000 people are killed on the roads in the US each year, with thousands of accidents every day. Carrying simple first aid equipment in your car can help to protect you at the scene of an accident and provide you with the tools to carry out necessary first aid procedures. In addition, a well-stocked first aid kit can provide many items needed to ensure comfort on long journeys.


PROTECTING YOURSELF

Many people are injured while helping at the scene of a road accident. If you stop to help, make sure that you are clearly visible to oncoming traffic. Use your car as a warning signal and consider carrying a combination of the following equipment:

  • Hazard warning triangle
  • High visibility jacket or strap
  • Flashlight

KEEPING THE INJURED PERSON WARM

  • Blanket (s)

There may be little that you can do for many seriously injured victims other than treat for shock. Keeping the person warm is an important part of this treatment and can be potentially life-saving. Carry at least one blanket in your car. In addition to its value in treating shock, it can also be used as padding for broken bones or to keep family members warm if your car breaks down in freezing conditions.

TREATING INJURIES

Space is often in short supply in the boot of a car so a first aid kit should be kept to the minimum. The following provides a basic guide for a car first aid kit:

  • 4 assorted sterile dressings: small, medium, and large
  • 2 triangular bandages
  • Adhesive bandages or non-adhesive dressings and hypoallergenic tape
  • Gloves and face shield
  • Notepad and pen

FAMILY JOURNEYS

In addition to carrying equipment for major emergencies, you may wish to include useful items for family travels.


These include:
  • Emesis bags
  • Moist towelettes or baby wipes
  • Alcohol wipes (when water is not available)
  • Cold pads (these are cold compress ice packs made from chemicals that get cold when you break the seal)
  • Over-the-counter remedies such as acetaminophen for common ailments

STORING YOUR FIRST AID KIT

If storing your first aid kit in the main part of the car, ensure that it is either made of a soft material or that it is firmly bolted down to prevent it becoming a dangerous missile if the car stops suddenly. The container should be waterproof and clearly labeled.

ON A BOAT

The guidance for cars applies equally well to boats. IN addition, boat first aid kits may include:

  • Strong pliers for cutting away fish hooks
  • Treatments for common marine animal bites and stings
  • Sun cream and relief for sunburn
  • Medication for crew members
 
 
 
First Aid Kit for the Car

 
 
 
 
 
 
First Aid Procedures
   
Drowning
Shock
Breathing Difficulties
Asthma
Anaphylactic Shock
Heart Problems
Stroke
Epilepsy
Unconsciousness
Diabetes
Bleeding
Treatment of External Bleeding
Bleeding from the Head or
Palm
Treating Chest or Abdominal
Wounds
Crush Injuries, Impalement,
and Amputation
Internal Bleeding
Eye Wounds and Embedded
Objects
Bleeding from Special Sites
Controlling Bleeding from the Mouth and Nose
Fractures, Discolorations, and
Soft Tissue Injuries
How to Treat Fractures
Fractures of the Skull, Face,
and Jaw
Concussion
Fractures of the Upper Body
Fractures of the Arm and Hand
Fractures of the Ribcage
Recognizing Back and Spinal
Injury
If you have to move the Victim
Unconscious Victim
Injuries to the Lower Body
Injuries to the Lower Leg
Sprains and Strains
Burns and Scalds
Treating Other Types of Burn
Chemical Burns and Eye Burns
Extreme Cold
Extreme Heat
Poisoning
Poisoning from Household
Chemicals
Poisoning from Industrial
Chemicals
Drug Poisoning
Alcohol Poisoning
Food Poisoning
Miscarriage
Emergency Childbirth
   
 
Wilderness First Aid
   
What to Do if You are a Long Way from Help
Wilderness First Aid
Avalanche and Snow Survival Techniques
Cold Water Survival
Techniques
Stretcher Improvising
Loading and Carrying a
Stretcher
One-and-Two-Person Carries
Helicopter Rescue